Monday, October 10, 2011

We'wha of Zuni: Two-spirit Native American remembered on Columbus Day

“We’wha of Zuni” by Br. Robert Lentz OFM,

We’wha was a two-spirit Native American Zuni who served as a cultural ambassador for her people, including a visit with a U.S. president in 1886. Contributions of Native Americans are remembered today for Columbus Day. Today We’wha is honored by many, including Native Americans and LGBT people.

Almost all Native American tribes traditionally recognized third and sometimes even fourth genders for people who mixed male and female characteristics. Today the many and varied Native American terms for alternative genders are called “two spirit,” because one body housed both feminine and masculine spirits. From a Western cultural viewpoint, they have been seen as gay or transgender.

We’wha (pronounced WAY-wah) was the most famous “lhamana,” the Zuni term for a male-bodied person who lived in part as a woman. Lhamanas chose to specialize in crafts instead of becoming warriors or hunters.

We’wha (1849-1896) was a skilled weaver and potter who helped Anglo-American scholars studying Zuni society. In 1886 We’wha traveled from her home in New Mexico to Washington DC, where she met president Grover Cleveland. She was welcomed as a celebrity during her six months in Washington. Everyone assumed that the 6-foot-tall “Indian princess” was female.

The spiritual side of We’wha is emphasized in an icon by Brother Robert Lentz (above). She is dressed for a religious ceremony as she prepares to put on the sacred mask of the man-woman spirit Kolhamana.

Jim Ru painted We’Wha in an icon (below) with a dramatic blue background. It was included in his show “Transcendent Faith: Gay, Lesbian and Transgendered Saints” in Bisbee Arizona in the 1990s.

We’wha is the subject of the book “The Zuni Man-Woman” by gay anthropologist Will Roscoe. He also wrote “Changing Ones: Third and Fourth Genders in Native North America” and “Jesus and the Shamanic Tradition of Same-Sex Love.” Roscoe’s newly redesigned website offers resources in the Native American two-spirit tradition, third genders in the ancient world, and studies in early Christianity.”

“We’wha” by Jim Ru

This post is part of the GLBT Saints series by Kittredge Cherry at the Jesus in Love Blog. Saints, martyrs, mystics, heroes, holy people, deities and religious figures of special interest to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) and queer people and our allies are covered on appropriate dates throughout the year.

Icons of We’wha and many others are available on cards, plaques, T-shirts, mugs, candles, mugs, and more at Trinity Stores

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